kropotkitten:

a successful pilfer

kropotkitten:

a successful pilfer



So the whole moving big change thing brings up all the usual problems:

Anxiety brain vs normal brain (luckily I got to chat with a fellow anxiety sufferer and get cheered up/help her with a similar anxiety struggle to one I went through last year about the GRE)

Eating! Remembering to eat, eating in unfamiliar settings, eating real food as opposed to just calling salsa and cherry tomatoes a meal. And finally the always terrifying - eating in front of new people (which I’ve avoided…. So at least one person in my cohort who I’ve gone out with twice may have figured out I don’t have a good relationship with eating!) but I cooked planned leftovers - wooooo and that always helps me make sure I eat. Baby steps.

Anyone have any adjustment tips? I have been doing a good job of staying hydrated, so that’s a start.




I don’t have a routine yet because classes just started yesterday and there’s not a shit ton of work yet and I’m on fellowship so I’m not TAing. So I feel like my whole life is chaos and my anxiety is completely petrifying. Happy Tuesday.



ppicasso:

People look at the stage curtain entitled ‘the Minotaur’s body dressed as Harlequin’ painted by Picasso in 1936 for Romain Rolland’s play ‘Le 14 Juillet’ at the Abattoirs museum in Toulouse, south of France, on April 28, 2011. The museum will be hosting the ‘Modern and contempory masterpieces’ exhibition from April, 15 to August 21, 2011.

ppicasso:

People look at the stage curtain entitled ‘the Minotaur’s body dressed as Harlequin’ painted by Picasso in 1936 for Romain Rolland’s play ‘Le 14 Juillet’ at the Abattoirs museum in Toulouse, south of France, on April 28, 2011. The museum will be hosting the ‘Modern and contempory masterpieces’ exhibition from April, 15 to August 21, 2011.

(via arpeggia)



asylum-art:

Faded Elegance: Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman

Presented by Tampa Museum of Art at Tampa Museum of Art

Faded Elegance: Photographs of Havana by Michael Eastman consists of twenty-nine, 6 x 7 1/2 ft. photographs taken by the artist in 2014. Eastman explores Havana’s changing cultural landscape in his images of the city’s architecture and lush,  by the effects of time. His large-scale photographs evoke the nostalgia and wealth of a bygone era, while shedding light on the harsh economic realities faced..



asylum-art:

Belgium’s  Flower Carpet Festival 

The Flower Carpet Festival is a popular event that takes place in Grand-Place Brussels every other year. Since 1971 over 600,000 Begonias flowers are arranged in an intense pattern filling the city square with a powerful and graphic carpet made entirely out of flowers. Taking months of planning to produce (with only 48 hours of install time) the event brings together landscape architects, technicians and hundreds of voluntary participants weave the flowers in place for the five day event!

(via asylum-art)


One year, I taught this (Sociological theory) class and only used female writers. The journals were written by women, the textbook was written by females. Do you know what kind of responses I got on my student evaluations that year? {…} That I was biased, that I was only looking from one point of view… that I was basically a man eater. That’s the kind of things I’d get from the students… The semester before, I used only male writers. Do you think I got any kind of feedback like that then?

"Not a single word."

Dr Rebecca Erikson, my professor, in her introduction of epistemology and challenging the main narrative

(via marloscruzin)

(via dauntlessdaughterofmary)


In some older versions of Persephone’s story, she was a young woman, not a young girl, and instead of accidentally wandering away, she had gone deliberately adventuring, when she fell, or was lured, or was kidnapped into Hell. Here Persephone’s adventurous spirit leads her into difficulty, instead of her being a passive victim of the wickedness of others. Her relationship with her mother gives her the courage to explore her world, and when events take a bad turn, their relationship gives her the strength to survive.

In a still older version, Persephone heard the despairing cries of the dead and chose freely to go into the Underworld to comfort them. Hades does not appear at all, in this version. Here Persephone’s descent to hell illustrates inclusiveness for every being, whether in the Underworld or in our present one, and shows that mercy is integral to her nature.

In the most ancient layer of myth, Persephone’s name means “She Who Destroys The Light.” She was the powerful Goddess of the Underworld long before anyone knew of Hades. Like the Indian Kali, the Irish Morrigan, and the Sumerian Ereshkegal, she was the Goddess of Death.